But I Don’t Know Where My Scene Is Going

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But I Don’t Know Where My Scene Is Going

What Do I Do?

I…have…no…idea…what…this…scene…means.

Ever thought that? At least it’s not so tragic as wondering why I’m writing this story.

Still…the scene seems pointless and…just…won’t…end. Stumble through to the end…or delete it?

Plotters have at least one advantage over plotters (they often call themselves discovery writers). If nothing else, I’d already beat my head against a wall figuring out a story flow. At least I’d had a vision, once, long ago, before putting any words to paper.

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Grimn’s Tales – Bridge At Chelson Gorge – First Draft Thoughts(1)

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Bridge At Chelson Gorge First Draft Thoughts (1)

Writing The First Draft (1)

Read about thoughts on a series.

I stared at a writer’s nightmare…

…a blank page.

My stomach fluttered and my breath caught.
What if no words came? What if I conjured up nothing?

No matter that I’d conjured up a series arc, and that, after endless dithering, a novelette sized story idea emerged…hopefully 12,000 words. On splitting my Scrivener screen, with scene notes on the right…that left screen, so pristine, pure, free of words gave me pause.

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Grimn’s Tales

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Grimn’s Tales

Eight Stories of Fantastic Adventure

Life threw us a curve…and we weren’t prepared. It punctuates a dreadful 2017…it cannot go to the grave soon enough. Too bad memories last a lifetime.

Long drives back and forth across Wyoming offered an escape from things closing in, giving me time to ponder whether to quit writing, or continue. Surprised that question even occurred, I wrestled with it before deciding to try a series of novelettes. With only 12,000 words, they won’t take as long to write, which means quicker feedback, unlike 130,000 word novels which take at least a year. But, am I skilled enough to write a series arc?

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Covers, Titles, Names and Blurbs

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Covers, Titles, Names, and Blurbs

Packaging Everything Together

The writing process is known to those knowing it well.

Except…some of us don’t know…not a smidgen.

No matter what coaching we get, as some point we must undertake our journey.  I discovered creating novels not unlike scaling Grand Mesa near Grand Junction, Colorado, except another mesa always awaits, obscured by clouds.  And I’ve ascended rock faces beyond counting – concept, outlines, first drafts, revisions beyond number, and edits without end.

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Growing A Blurb

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Thoughts On A Book Blurb

Growing A Blurb

Last time, I promised to report back if I got any feedback on my blurb.  And…I got feedback…so here I am.

But, let’s back up a little.  In an earlier post I mentioned Beth Bacon’s suggestion of writing blurbs in four parts:  (1)  Situation; (2) Problem;  (3) Hopeful Possibility;  and (4) Mood.

And I did…and hated it.  Someone commented that each paragraph felt like the end…and wished it had.

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Thoughts On A Book Blurb

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Thoughts On A Book Blurb

Does Anyone Look At These Things?

 

Blurbs…words on the back of paperbacks…ones we read if we get past the cover.

Does anyone read them before deciding?

Honestly, I’d relegated blurbs to that pile of I’ve got to do this before I finish…until I handed my old Paperwhite to my sister-in-law the night before we came home.

At breakfast, she had it.

My mouth got dry and my heart raced.

Then she turned to me. “The battery ran down so I didn’t get far.  But you need a synopsis…or blurb…or something.  I can’t tell what’s going on.”  Done, he handed it back and went off to pack.

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Structuring A Series

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Structuring A Series

What Would A Series Look Like?

 

Read earlier thoughts I had on a series.
Ever pondered what ties a TV series together?

In the early days, cast or setting bound series together.  We watched episodes in any order because each episode stood on its own, and they weren’t connected.  Summer reruns simply picked the best and showed them a second time

Recently, series have included over-arching season or series problems.  Consider two examples.  In Burn Notice, each episode contains a full arc, with several minutes devoted to struggling with a larger story issue.  In each episode, we solve the weekly problem…and get a little closer to beating the season problem.  With each installment, readers get a complete story…but writers must conjure with new plots for each episode.  As to skipping episodes or watching out of order continuity problems might arise.

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